Finding inspiration in architecture and nature, Janine Wilson has painted a variety of subject matter—always with an eye for color, contrast, and design.

Originally from the Midwest, Janine's first visual art was photography, which led her to earn a BS degree in Photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1979. She relocated to New Mexico in 1995 and has been an exhibitor and award-winning member of the Enchanted Lens Camera Club of Albuquerque. Although photography influences her painting, Janine has pursued creative expression in the mediums of watercolor and acrylic since 2006.

Influenced by the paintings of Fredrich Hammersley and Helen Hardin, Janine's most recent work has evolved into a series of hard edge acrylic abstractions. "I am drawn to repeating patterns and shapes and how they relate to each other, so my art reflects this in whichever media I pursue" says Janine. Strong color adds rhythm and movement to her bold compositions.

Along with her paintings being featured on the cover of the New Mexico State Bar Bulletin, Janine's work has been shown in numerous local group shows and juried exhibitions at New Mexico Masterworks, The New Mexico Art League, New Mexico Watercolor Society, and Ghostwolf Gallery in Old Town Albuquerque. In 2017, Janine exhibited a large body of work in the two-person exhibit, "Double Vision", at Matrix Fine Art Gallery in Albuquerque.

Janine is a member of the Enchanted Lens Camera Club, Rainbow Artists, the Yucca Branch of the National League of American Penwomen, Rio Grande Art Association and a Signature Member of The New Mexico Watercolor Society.

Artist Statement

Point of view is what an artist offers the viewer in a work of art. I am drawn to repeating patterns and shapes and how they relate to each other so my art reflects this in every media I pursue.

Since I was a photographer before I was a painter, approaching abstract painting with photographs seemed like a valid approach. This series was originally called Derivatives since the paintings are derived from photographs of stairs, shadows and buildings with interesting shapes with repeating patterns.

The photograph is converted to black and white, really bumping up the contrast and then design is considered. The original image is often rotated and modified by adding or subtracting lines to strengthen the design and movement within the painting. Acrylic colors are applied one at a time which helps create the sense of movement within the painting.

Repeating patterns seem to be a metaphor for life. The rhythm of our lives is shaped by our repeating behavior patterns. Sometimes these are good behaviors, sometimes not. Do we learn from this? Do we grow and change our behavior? Do the patterns and rhythms of our lives change?